The Ultimate Swimming Road Trip: 11 Swimming Holes and Hidden Waterfalls
Forget the water parks, ditch the public swimming pools, and bid farewell to your sprinkler. These 11 waterfalls and swimming holes are some of the best spots to cool off the way Mother Nature intended. Grab your beach towel, slip on a swimsuit, and get going.
1. HAVASU FALLS, GRAND CANYON.
If you’re looking for a swimming hole that’s convenient and easy to get to, this isn’t it. If you’re looking for a swimming hole that comes with unparalleled beauty and earns you bragging rights for even locating it, Havasu Falls is where you need to be.
There are only three ways to get to this 90-foot waterfall in the Grand Canyon. If you’re really splurging, you can helicopter in. If you’re really athletic, you can hike a challenging 10-mile trail. The third option: Hire a pack mule to ferry you down. Whichever way you take, you’ll be rewarded with vivid blue-green pools and a stunning waterfall with a hidden rock shelter behind it.
2. HAMILTON POOL, TEXAS.
Thousands of years ago, the dome of an underground river collapsed, giving a little skylight to this previously hidden pool in Texas. These days, the site is so picturesque that several movies have been filmed there. And with its 50-foot waterfall, jade green pool, limestone slabs, and stalactites, it’s easy to see why.
Head over to The Daily Catch to read more of the story!
Originally posted in Mental_Floss.

The Ultimate Swimming Road Trip: 11 Swimming Holes and Hidden Waterfalls

Forget the water parks, ditch the public swimming pools, and bid farewell to your sprinkler. These 11 waterfalls and swimming holes are some of the best spots to cool off the way Mother Nature intended. Grab your beach towel, slip on a swimsuit, and get going.

1. HAVASU FALLS, GRAND CANYON.

If you’re looking for a swimming hole that’s convenient and easy to get to, this isn’t it. If you’re looking for a swimming hole that comes with unparalleled beauty and earns you bragging rights for even locating it, Havasu Falls is where you need to be.

There are only three ways to get to this 90-foot waterfall in the Grand Canyon. If you’re really splurging, you can helicopter in. If you’re really athletic, you can hike a challenging 10-mile trail. The third option: Hire a pack mule to ferry you down. Whichever way you take, you’ll be rewarded with vivid blue-green pools and a stunning waterfall with a hidden rock shelter behind it.

2. HAMILTON POOL, TEXAS.

Thousands of years ago, the dome of an underground river collapsed, giving a little skylight to this previously hidden pool in Texas. These days, the site is so picturesque that several movies have been filmed there. And with its 50-foot waterfall, jade green pool, limestone slabs, and stalactites, it’s easy to see why.

Head over to The Daily Catch to read more of the story!

Originally posted in Mental_Floss.

In mari multa latent, goes the old saying: “In the ocean many things are hidden.” And it’s true enough. There is still much we don’t know about what lurks in the depths, save for wonders that the occasional submersible dive turns up. But for millennia, humans have simply taken to guessing what could be swimming Earth’s oceans. Europeans, for instance, just assumed for a long while that every land critter had a counterpart in the sea, hence sea rhinos and sea cows and even the sea monks and sea bishops, the aquatic representatives of the human race.
Some of these beasts, though, are more grounded in reality than others. And none of these are more famed or feared or strangely real than the kraken, also known somewhat awesomely in lore as the “sea-mischief,” a legendary tentacled giant so powerful that it could pull down ships. Cross this monster and you’ll find yourself praying there’s a sea bishop or two in the depths to attend to your corpse.
Check out the rest of the article at The Daily Catch!

In mari multa latent, goes the old saying: “In the ocean many things are hidden.” And it’s true enough. There is still much we don’t know about what lurks in the depths, save for wonders that the occasional submersible dive turns up. But for millennia, humans have simply taken to guessing what could be swimming Earth’s oceans. Europeans, for instance, just assumed for a long while that every land critter had a counterpart in the sea, hence sea rhinos and sea cows and even the sea monks and sea bishops, the aquatic representatives of the human race.

Some of these beasts, though, are more grounded in reality than others. And none of these are more famed or feared or strangely real than the kraken, also known somewhat awesomely in lore as the “sea-mischief,” a legendary tentacled giant so powerful that it could pull down ships. Cross this monster and you’ll find yourself praying there’s a sea bishop or two in the depths to attend to your corpse.

Check out the rest of the article at The Daily Catch!

A European Union-funded research project called MUNIN is looking to make international cargo shipping more energy and cost efficient, essentially turning “seafaring” into a desk job. Named for one of the Nordic god Odin’s raven sidekicks, the goal of the MUNIN project is to create autonomous ships that can sail themselves from port to port. This would reduce energy consumption by lessening lighting, eliminating fresh water production, and getting rid of an onboard crew.
Check out the rest of the article here: A European Union-funded research project called MUNIN is looking to make international cargo shipping more energy and cost efficient, essentially turning “seafaring” into a desk job. Named for one of the Nordic god Odin’s raven sidekicks, the goal of the MUNIN project is to create autonomous ships that can sail themselves from port to port. This would reduce energy consumption by lessening lighting, eliminating fresh water production, and getting rid of an onboard crew. 
Check out the rest of the article on The Daily Catch!

Photo: rollsroycemotorcars

A European Union-funded research project called MUNIN is looking to make international cargo shipping more energy and cost efficient, essentially turning “seafaring” into a desk job. Named for one of the Nordic god Odin’s raven sidekicks, the goal of the MUNIN project is to create autonomous ships that can sail themselves from port to port. This would reduce energy consumption by lessening lighting, eliminating fresh water production, and getting rid of an onboard crew.

Check out the rest of the article here: A European Union-funded research project called MUNIN is looking to make international cargo shipping more energy and cost efficient, essentially turning “seafaring” into a desk job. Named for one of the Nordic god Odin’s raven sidekicks, the goal of the MUNIN project is to create autonomous ships that can sail themselves from port to port. This would reduce energy consumption by lessening lighting, eliminating fresh water production, and getting rid of an onboard crew. 

Check out the rest of the article on The Daily Catch!

Photo: rollsroycemotorcars

Astronaut Jeremy Jensen is spending a week under the sea at the Aquarius Reef Base off the Florida Coast. Located 20 meters (65ft) underwater, he’ll be able to simulate space-like environments. Check out our story on The Daily Catch!
Photo: Jeremy Jensen

Astronaut Jeremy Jensen is spending a week under the sea at the Aquarius Reef Base off the Florida Coast. Located 20 meters (65ft) underwater, he’ll be able to simulate space-like environments. Check out our story on The Daily Catch!

Photo: Jeremy Jensen

The Southern Ocean that encircles Antarctica lends a considerable hand in keeping Earth’s temperature hospitable by soaking up half of the human-made carbon in the atmosphere and a majority of the planet’s excess heat. Yet, the inner workings—and global importance—of this ocean that accounts for 30 percent of the world’s ocean area remains relatively unknown to scientists, as dangerous seas hinder observations.
Princeton University and 10 partner institutions seek to make the Southern Ocean better known scientifically and publicly through a $21 million program that will create a biogeochemical and physical portrait of the ocean using an expanded computational capacity and hundreds of robotic floats deployed around Antarctica. The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling program, or SOCCOM, is a six-year initiative headquartered at Princeton and funded by the National Science Foundation’s Division of Polar Programs, with additional support from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA.
Check out more of the story at The Daily Catch!
Photo: BAS

The Southern Ocean that encircles Antarctica lends a considerable hand in keeping Earth’s temperature hospitable by soaking up half of the human-made carbon in the atmosphere and a majority of the planet’s excess heat. Yet, the inner workings—and global importance—of this ocean that accounts for 30 percent of the world’s ocean area remains relatively unknown to scientists, as dangerous seas hinder observations.

Princeton University and 10 partner institutions seek to make the Southern Ocean better known scientifically and publicly through a $21 million program that will create a biogeochemical and physical portrait of the ocean using an expanded computational capacity and hundreds of robotic floats deployed around Antarctica. The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling program, or SOCCOM, is a six-year initiative headquartered at Princeton and funded by the National Science Foundation’s Division of Polar Programs, with additional support from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA.

Check out more of the story at The Daily Catch!

Photo: BAS

Love the Ocean? Sign our Petition!

We love the ocean.

The ocean has been in a state of decline for decades. In the past twenty years science has developed the ability to measure and quantify the damage, and the results are alarming:

Ocean Acidification—-Climate Change—-Collapsed Fisheries—-Plastic Pollution

The United Nations can turn this runaway train around by including the oceans in the Sustainable Development Goals later in September, and is bringing world leaders to New York to discuss what they should focus on for the next 15 years—but the ocean needs your help…

Click on the right to tell the UN that you love the ocean and create a tidal wave of change.

- The TerraMar Project