This Ancient Lobe Coral was photographed in Kingman Reef in the remote islands Line Islands (South Pacific). This coral is over 500 years old but this particular species was only recently discovered by marine ecologists Enric Sala. Coral such as this thrive in Kingman which remains one of the most untouched and unchanged reef ecosystems in the world.
Photo: Brian J. Skerry via National Geographic 
 

This Ancient Lobe Coral was photographed in Kingman Reef in the remote islands Line Islands (South Pacific). This coral is over 500 years old but this particular species was only recently discovered by marine ecologists Enric Sala. Coral such as this thrive in Kingman which remains one of the most untouched and unchanged reef ecosystems in the world.

Photo: Brian J. Skerry via National Geographic 

 

Photo: Tim Laman, National Geographic
"Cassiopea andromeda, the upside-down jellyfish, is named for one of Greek mythology’s treacherous queens. Cassiopeia was punished by Poseidon, who deemed that her constellation often appear upside-down in the sky. Her namesake jelly often lies on the seafloor with its mouth and arms facing the surface, which allows symbiotic algae to collect sunlight for photosynthesis and pass nutrients along to the jelly. Crabs sometimes carry these jellyfish on their backs to serve as a very effective protective shield.” 
Source: National Geographic Jellyfish photo gallery 

Photo: Tim Laman, National Geographic

"Cassiopea andromeda, the upside-down jellyfish, is named for one of Greek mythology’s treacherous queens. Cassiopeia was punished by Poseidon, who deemed that her constellation often appear upside-down in the sky. Her namesake jelly often lies on the seafloor with its mouth and arms facing the surface, which allows symbiotic algae to collect sunlight for photosynthesis and pass nutrients along to the jelly. Crabs sometimes carry these jellyfish on their backs to serve as a very effective protective shield.” 

Source: National Geographic Jellyfish photo gallery